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Transport & Logistics careers

Environmental Transport: Pedestrian, Cycling & Others

Why is environmental transport so important?

If Boris Johnson’s bike hire scheme in London is anything to go by, people are becoming far more aware of eco-friendly ways to travel. According to the BBC, over 1,000,000 journeys were made in the first ten weeks of Boris’ bike scheme. Can you believe that?

There are hundreds and thousands of different activities going on to promote and create greener transport. Consequently, there are various different ways of forging a career in environmental transport.

How can I get involved with environmental transport?

If you have an interest in the environment and reducing our carbon footprint, there are various ways you can put your skills and passions to good use. Many people want to travel green, but simply don’t know the options and possibilities. Your career could help them do just that!

More than anything, candidates must show a passion for the environment and see their career as so much more than ‘just a job’.

Try and get work experience in this sector first! It doesn’t necessarily need to be within environmental transport exactly, but you should certainly get involved with something to do with the environment.

Companies and charities are always looking for volunteers and any experience you get will show your genuine enthusiasm for the environment. You never know, if you play your cards right, you might just go some way to saving the planet.

What could I do within environmental transport?

One of the most popular areas of environmental transport is the planning side of things. Implementing cycle paths and pedestrian highways is a huge task, but everything is done for a reason. The routes that cyclists and pedestrians travel each day are all planned by transport planners.

Furthermore, once a route has been planned, somebody is responsible for the upkeep and management of the transport infrastructure and services. Check out the Transport Management & Planning subsector for more info!

Now let’s talk about the marketing side of things. Any environmental transport campaign will need to be promoted. This requires marketing executives, PR gurus and advertising professionals to get the word out there.

You could be doing anything from meeting journalists and encouraging them to write about the campaign, creating launch events or choosing where best to advertise.

Most roles in this area are available in governmental positions or for local councils and charities. Obviously, these campaigns don’t always have to be as big as Boris’ £140m bike scheme. They can range from anything like ‘park and ride’ schemes in city centres, to implementing a new way for children to travel to school.

For more didactic roles, you could find work in an environmental consultant position. You’d spend your time advising people on how best to travel in an eco-friendly way. You could find yourself working with multi-million pound companies, educating them on how to transport their products around the globe in a more environmentally sustainable way.

Alternatively, you could be educating school children, explaining how and why walking, or cycling, to school could save the planet.

There’s a huge demand at the moment for more environmentally friendly products in the market. You can’t watch an episode of Dragon’s Den without seeing Duncan Bannatyne getting worked up over some potential planet-saving product.

If you’re something of an inventor, or an environmentalist with a head for science, you could go into transport engineering and work to devise and build new environmentally friendly transport methods.

Does a ‘greener’ way of life, where the black clouds steaming forth from buses and cars galore are mere myth, appeal to you? Me too! But we need people to work in the environmental transport subsector to make this dream a reality, so if what you’ve read has caught your attention then go forth and save the world!